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Vernier & Associates PLLC - The Woodlands Divorce Lawyers
Available 24 Hours A Day
a skilled trial attorney with a proven track record.
committed, experienced legal advocates on your side
results-oriented, experienced, assertive
zealous representation from experienced family law attorneys
a skilled trial attorney with a proven track record.
committed, experienced legal advocates on your side

Managing a new school year after a recent divorce

| Aug 30, 2018 | Divorce

Now that school is back in session, families across Texas are getting back into the swing of the school year schedule. For those who’ve gone through a recent divorce, figuring out how to juggle a custody schedule and school schedule can be challenging. These seemingly small details are usually not part of a formal custody agreement, but they make up the day-to-day realities that can make divorce so hard to bear. 

Communication is the best way to avoid conflict over school scheduling. Rather than focus on which parent’s “day” it is and making decisions on school events based on two different sets of priorities, parents can work together to share scheduling information. There are some excellent online scheduling tools that can help. 

For example, if a family has a high school football player and a middle school band student, there are going to be a lot of practices, performances and games to attend. If one parent isn’t fully aware of the schedule, he or she can quickly become irritated when seemingly last-minute events pop up. Sharing a school schedule can prevent those things from devolving into bitter arguments. 

Raising kids involves a great deal of sacrifice and compromise — things that many parents have in short supply for a few years after their divorce. By sharing details about the school year schedule, neither party will feel left out of the loop when it comes to the lives of their children. That can go a long way toward easing strife and tension between Texas parents. 

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